.: Game Land :. PC Games Weekly Guide

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My Mega Image Tomb Raider in 1996 was one of the first 3D third-person shooter games and was praised for its revolutionary graphics. Later games combined textual commands with basic graphics, as seen in the SSI Gold Box games such as Pool of Radiance, or Bard's Tale for example. To enhance the immersive experience with their unrealistic graphics and electronic sound, early PC games included extras such as the peril-sensitive sunglasses that shipped with The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy or the science fiction novella included with Elite. Tomb Raider in 1996 was one of the first 3D third-person shooter games and was praised for its revolutionary graphics. Computer games, however, did not disappear. Today, such extras are usually found only in Special Edition versions of games, such as Battlechests from Blizzard.

Their defining characteristics include a lack of any centralized controlling authority, a greater degree of user control over the video-gaming hardware and software used and a generally greater capacity in input, processing, and output. By 1987 the PC market was growing so quickly that the formerly business-only computer had become the largest and most important platform for computer game companies. Players found modifying CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files for memory management cumbersome and confusing, and each game needed a different configuration.

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  • The first generation of computer games were often text adventures or interactive fiction, in which the player communicated with the computer by entering commands through a keyboard.
  • As with second-generation video game consoles at the time, early home computer game companies capitalized on successful arcade games at the time with ports or clones of popular arcade games.[6][7] By 1982, the top-selling games for the Atari 400 were ports of Frogger and Centipede, while the top-selling game for the Texas Instruments TI-99/4A was the Space Invaders clone TI Invaders.[6] That same year, Pac-Man was ported to the Atari 800,[7] while Donkey Kong was licensed for the Coleco Adam.[8] In late 1981, Atari attempted to take legal action against unauthorized clones, particularly Pac-Man clones, despite some of these predating Atari's exclusive rights to the home versions of Namco's game. By 1990 DOS comprised 65% of the computer-game market, with the Amiga at 10%; all other computers, including the Apple Macintosh, were below 10% and declining.
More than a third of games sold in North America were for the PC, twice as many as those for the Apple II and even outselling those for the Commodore 64.